AskDefine | Define antibody

Dictionary Definition

antibody n : any of a large variety of proteins normally present in the body or produced in response to an antigen which it neutralizes, thus producing an immune response

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Pronunciation

Noun

  1. A protein produced by B-lymphocytes that binds to a specific antigen.

Translations

protein that binds to a specific antigen
  • Chinese: 抗体, 抗體
  • Croatian: antitijelo
  • Czech: protilátka
  • Dutch: antilichaam, antideeltje
  • Esperanto: antikorpo, antipartiklo
  • Finnish: vasta-aine
  • French: anticorps
  • German: Antikörper
  • Japanese: 抗体
  • Portuguese: anticorpo
  • Romanian: anticorp

Extensive Definition

Antibodies (also known as immunoglobulins) are gamma globulin proteins that are found in blood or other bodily fluids of vertebrates, and are used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects, such as bacteria and viruses. They are typically made of basic structural units - each with two large heavy chains and two small light chains - to form, for example, monomers with one unit, dimers with two units or pentamers with five units. Antibodies are produced by a kind of white blood cell called a B cell. There are several different types of antibody heavy chain, and several different kinds of antibodies, which are grouped into different isotypes based on which heavy chain they possess. Five different antibody isotypes are known in mammals, which perform different roles, and help direct the appropriate immune response for each different type of foreign object they encounter.
Although the general structure of all antibodies is very similar, a small region at the tip of the protein is extremely variable, allowing millions of antibodies with slightly different tip structures to exist. This region is known as the hypervariable region. Each of these variants can bind to a different target, known as an antigen. This huge diversity of antibodies allows the immune system to recognize an equally wide diversity of antigens. The unique part of the antigen recognized by an antibody is called an epitope. These epitopes bind with their antibody in a highly specific interaction, called induced fit, that allows antibodies to identify and bind only their unique antigen in the midst of the millions of different molecules that make up an organism. Recognition of an antigen by an antibody tags it for attack by other parts of the immune system. Antibodies can also neutralize targets directly by, for example, binding to a part of a pathogen that it needs to cause an infection.
The large and diverse population of antibodies is generated by random combinations of a set of gene segments that encode different antigen binding sites (or paratopes), followed by random mutations in this area of the antibody gene, which create further diversity. Antibody genes also re-organize in a process called class switching that changes the base of the heavy chain to another, creating a different isotype of the antibody that retains the antigen specific variable region. This allows a single antibody to be used by several different parts of the immune system. Production of antibodies is the main function of the humoral immune system.

Antibody forms

Antibodies occur in two forms: a soluble form secreted into the blood and tissue fluids, and a membrane-bound form attached to the surface of a B cell that is called the B cell receptor (BCR). The BCR allows a B cell to detect when a specific antigen is present in the body and triggers B cell activation. Activated B cells differentiate into either antibody generating factories called plasma cells that secrete soluble antibody, or into memory cells that survive in the body for years afterwards to allow the immune system to remember an antigen and respond faster upon future exposures. Antibodies are, therefore, an essential component of the adaptive immune system that learns, adapts and remembers responses to invading pathogens.

Isotypes

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

Rh factor, Rh-negative, Rh-positive, Rh-type, Rhesus factor, acquired immunity, active immunity, agglutinin, allergen, anaphylactin, antiantibody, antigen, antiserum, antitoxic serum, antitoxin, antivenin, arterial blood, artificial immunity, blood, blood bank, blood cell, blood count, blood donor, blood donor center, blood group, blood grouping, blood picture, blood platelet, blood pressure, blood serum, blood substitute, bloodmobile, bloodstream, circulation, clinical dextran, congenital immunity, dextran, erythrocyte, familial immunity, globulin, gore, grume, hematics, hematologist, hematology, hematoscope, hematoscopy, hemocyte, hemoglobin, hemometer, humor, ichor, immunity, immunization, incomplete antibody, inherent immunity, inherited immunity, interferon, isoantibody, leukocyte, lifeblood, natural immunity, neutrophil, nonspecific immunity, nonsusceptibility to disease, opsonic immunity, opsonin, passive immunity, phagocyte, phagocytic immunity, plasma, plasma substitute, precipitin, racial immunity, red corpuscle, resistance, serum, specific immunity, toxin-antitoxin immunity, type O, venous blood, white corpuscle
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